Carlos Correa: Free-agent shortstop saga ends with World Series winner returning to Minnesota Twins



CNN
 — 

The free-agent saga surrounding shortstop Carlos Correa has lastly come to an finish.

The coveted World Series winner signed a six-year assured contract to return to the Minnesota Twins, the MLB staff introduced Wednesday.

The deal is reportedly value $200 million, in line with the wage monitoring web site Spotrac.

Minnesota is the third MLB staff this offseason with whom the 28-year-old has agreed a large deal.

“I’m happy to be here in Minnesota, I’m happy to be a Twin,” Correa instructed reporters Wednesday.

“We started something special last year and there is some more work to be done. At the end of the day, we want to bring a championship back to this city. That’s what we’re going to work for from now on.”

After a lone season in Minnesota, Correa agreed on a 13-year, $350 million contract on December 13 with the San Francisco Giants, in line with Spotrac. That deal fell by way of as a result of considerations arising from his bodily.

Eight days later, the New York Mets supplied the shortstop a 12-year, $315 million deal, per Spotrac. However that deal additionally fell aside due to his bodily.

In a press release Wednesday, the Mets stated: “We were unable to reach an agreement. We wish Carlos all the best.”

Correa signed with the Twins on a three-year, $105.3 million deal, per Spotrac, in March. He opted out of the ultimate two years in November.

The Santa Isabel, Puerto Rico native hit .291 with 22 residence runs and 64 RBI in 136 video games final season.

Previous to becoming a member of the Twins, the 2012 prime general draft choose for the Houston Astros performed with the Astros for seven seasons and was named to 2 All-Star groups in 2017 and 2021.

Correa was a part of Houston’s first World Series title staff in 2017. He received his first Gold Glove, which is awarded to the most effective defender at every place, in 2021.

The 28-year-old has batted .279 with 155 homers and 553 RBI in eight MLB seasons.